Wood topsheet - best way to protect from the elements

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Boulderski
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Wood topsheet - best way to protect from the elements

Post by Boulderski »

The last several ski builds I have made I have been doing wood topsheets with maple and bamboo. The sidewalls are also wood/bamboo mix. I have experimented with different methods to protect the wood Topsheet and sidewalls:
- Clear sheet on top of wood - probably the best protection for top of ski. Downsides: it does not cover side of ski, and honestly I just don't like it as much :) It takes away from the wood and the engraving work i do on topsheet of ski

- Epoxy coat after pressing - cover entire top and sides of ski with epoxy coat. Has an excellent look too it and seems to protect the ski from water damage
Downsides: it scuffs up pretty quickly from edges/tips crossing. After a few season the epoxy coat might needed sanded and a fresh coat put on (I have one like this I have rode for 2 seasons).

I don't want to give up on my natural looking skis - I know there has to be a better solution. On my next build I was thinking about doing a thin layer of glass after pressing and cutting out ski - the glass would cover topsheet and down to side edge.
I would appreciate any advice or thoughts? Thanks guys![/img]

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Akiwi
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Post by Akiwi »

I Will follow this topic with interest as I have now built 2 snowboards and 2 sets of skis with a wood veneer topsheet.
As the epoxy is pulled into the veneer, I figure it is relatively well protected from water. The question is how best to protect it from sctatches etc.

I use vacuum bagging to make my skis / boards, and on top of the veneer have a Peel Ply layer, then release film, and then breather cloth.
In preperation for finishing, I sand the surface with 180 then 240 sandpaper normally wet.

As an experiment, one board I oiled it. I used an oil for working surfaces.. benches etc. It looks great, feels beautiful, and is easy to apply .. just with a rag.

On the rest I have a 2 component Clear Coat from the car industry.
I have yet to see how they work.
I apply it using a HVLP spray pistol. Did a second coat on my skis this morning before work.
Last edited by Akiwi on Mon Dec 21, 2015 6:48 am, edited 1 time in total.
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mammuth
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Post by mammuth »

If you dont want to use just oil look for 2k paint for the boat industry. Not sure how they work in the cold and with flex, but i think its ok. Super durable and if you look on old restored riva wood boats the finish comes out marvelous. Very scratch resistant.
Tom

chrislandy
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Post by chrislandy »

Durepox clear 2k polyurethane topcoat.

It's a special marine finish. Flexible, durable, only downside really is that it's reasonably expensive and you need a proper spray booth and protective equipment etc to use it. You may be able to apply it by brush so that would get past a lot of the issues.

I intend to test it on a wakeboard next year to protect the base on sliders and kickers etc

Boulderski
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durepox poly coat

Post by Boulderski »

Thanks Chris and everyone for your replies - sounds like I need to try out some marine polycoats... unfortunately I wont have a proper spray setup this season. Anyone brushed on marine polycoat?

Anyone have pics or opinion as to how well it holds up after a few seasons of abuse?

I need to figure out how to post pics - ha! I would like to show some of the wear and tear on my last setups... Il have to figure that out soon.

Boulderski
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Post by Boulderski »

[/img]ImageImage

mammuth
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Post by mammuth »

Wow! You should oil them, i think this brings out the engraving better.
Tom

Boulderski
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Post by Boulderski »

Image

Boulderski
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Post by Boulderski »

like boiled linseed oil? I think it would protect wood from water damage but I want some protection from chipping/ edges scuffing wood

mammuth
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Post by mammuth »

I think aging is part of the game ;)

Take a look there, peter is oiling and waxing his skis.
http://www.rabbitontheroof.net/en/

To protect against the edges even PU 2K will not hold up....
Tom

Richuk
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Post by Richuk »

Moisture cure urethane will protect the edges of the topsheet and the laminate.

Leaf skis used a polyurethane and it worth considering.

Oil and wax ... fairly pointless.

Boulderski
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Post by Boulderski »

i had never seen rabbit on the roof - I like the look of there skis very much... another company that does wood topsheets is forrest skis... they seem to some sort of epoxy or urethane coat.
- but I don't know anyone who has rode these skis for longer than a season or two so I am very curios as to how well they hold up.

I have done some urethane in the past but it seems to scuff easy - but it was not Marine use. My biggest concern is that my sidewalls have multiple layers and when ski edge hits just right it seems to chip up the top layer. Here is a pic of my sidewalls
Image

twizzstyle
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Post by twizzstyle »

Hang on a minute - is that the coolest thing I've ever seen on homemade skis? I think it just might be. Well done, those are gorgeous skis.

I have nothing to add to this discussion (I've done a few wood veneer skis now, but all with a clear topsheet). You could maybe find a very thin plastic material that could be heated and vacuum pressed, but that's probably more work than necessary given all of the other options others have offered.

MadRussian
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Post by MadRussian »

you can find a lot of products on two parts PU if you search online or locally. problem some of them very dangerous and (as mentioned above) require protective equipment such as breeding air not a regular respirator with filter but special breeding air system. Also moisture curing product difficult to deal with. They require control environment sometimes.
Price for those products start $150. Highest I got quoted $600 a gallon from automotive paint store. Also nobody want to give/sell samples or small quantity… Minimum amount 1 gallon kit. Not to mention hazmat surcharge for shipping

I don't think I automotive clearcoat hard enough for skis… Look at the cars they get scratched up easily. in my experience wider the skis more abuse sidewall/top sidewall edge get. Especially in bumps and spring bumps.

bottom line every industry looking for the exact same topcoat properties as we are and those who make them want the premium $$$$ for their product.
I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work.
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chrislandy
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Post by chrislandy »

Linky to german site
http://www.maritimusboote.de/epages/289 ... cts/DURC-4
you will need hardener / catalyst plus if spraying the thinners too. I approached a local automotive spray shop and they came up with a good rate for doing them - as it was a time charge the cost was the same for 1 board or 10

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