The pouring urethane sidewall thread

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Dtrain
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Post by Dtrain » Wed Nov 19, 2014 7:25 pm

If you mean dumping polyurethane varnish in supersap and using for a sidewall, that's a no go

bdankner
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Post by bdankner » Wed Nov 19, 2014 7:53 pm

haha I know that I'm just wondering if there is a place that I can find polyurethane or if I must order it.

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chrismp
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Post by chrismp » Thu Nov 20, 2014 1:03 am

Read this entire thread and you'll have an idea what to get! Most people in the US order the stuff from smooth-on.

gav wa
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Post by gav wa » Thu Nov 20, 2014 4:34 am

I've started using Erapol products. They have every hardness you could think of using, 85A, 95A, 60D, 70D and I can get a 1.1kilo kit for about $38.
The only negative is you really need to add a pigment as they are just your usual light amber resin color. The smooth on stuff has a very cool bright white.

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chrismp
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Post by chrismp » Fri Nov 21, 2014 12:26 am

Damn, that stuff is expensive...I pay about 15 USD for a kilo of adiprene! I buy them in batches of 40kg at a time though.

gav wa
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Post by gav wa » Fri Nov 21, 2014 7:49 am

I'm sure if I bought 40kg I might be able to get a better deal than i currently do chris :)
Materials can be expensive here, a smooth on trial size kit is nearly $50

I use about 550 grams per board. How many 40kg orders are you making a year mate.

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chrismp
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Post by chrismp » Fri Nov 21, 2014 10:17 am

Haven't really kept track...we build skis as well and they use about 1.2kg of resin.

Dtrain
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Post by Dtrain » Fri Nov 21, 2014 3:41 pm

Chris, being a a cnc guy you def. need to start dong the inverse profile channel. Saves half the poly. We just do it 2mm deeper for wiggle room.Skim plane the bottom flat. Flip over and profile down to the poly. Have not wrecked one yet. But I'm sure we will :) boards don't waste a ton with full channels , but skis waste a ton.

gozaimaas
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Post by gozaimaas » Fri Nov 21, 2014 4:35 pm

Dtrain wrote:Chris, being a a cnc guy you def. need to start dong the inverse profile channel. Saves half the poly. We just do it 2mm deeper for wiggle room.Skim plane the bottom flat. Flip over and profile down to the poly. Have not wrecked one yet. But I'm sure we will :) boards don't waste a ton with full channels , but skis waste a ton.
I do that without cnc by making the routing template the reverse profile.
Works perfectly

Dtrain
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Post by Dtrain » Fri Nov 21, 2014 11:09 pm

That's f@&king genius. Straight up!

Dtrain
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Post by Dtrain » Fri Nov 21, 2014 11:13 pm

Id love to see a picture.

gozaimaas
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Post by gozaimaas » Sat Nov 22, 2014 1:59 am

Ok, firstly I profile my cores through a drum sander on a profiling bed.
To create the appropriate profile I run a board through the sander on my profiling jig, this will come out the same profile as a finished core. I keep this to use on future routing templates.
Now I run the actual routing template through the sander on top of the previous board, the result is the routing template has the reverse profile, thin in the middle and thick on the ends which obviously translates when using it to rout as deep in the middle and shallow on the ends.
It works a charm.

Image

camhard
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Post by camhard » Wed Nov 18, 2015 3:01 pm

Genius indeed!

Haven't been on here in a while, but had a quick search and didn't find anything:

Anyone used a pour gun for sidewalls? Could pull the air out of both part a and b in separate pots, heat it somewhat and push the material through to a mixing tip. I know of some major manufacturers using similar setups, but unfortunately all of the equipment I've found is very pricey, but not terribly complicated looking. I'd love to come up with another solution.

Michael Engineering has a lot of good looking stuff for inspiration. All seems pretty straight forward too. Silica gel canisters to suck out as much moisture as possible!

Some fancier looking options at Nordson

Some guy also made a cordless drill attachment and called it the Dra-gun. Seems to be that he wasn't that successful with it though, and I think sold the idea. It is available at Fiberlay, but still costs over 1300 bucks!

There's gotta be a better solution.

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Akiwi
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Post by Akiwi » Thu Nov 19, 2015 12:27 am

Not sure how easy it would be to controll your mixing values in 2 seperate tubes up to a disposable mixing tip.
Like this.
http://www.amazon.com/Adhesive-Applicat ... ixing+tips
At $1.00 per tip you don't have the hassle of cleaning up afterwards.
I am nobody. Nobody's perfect, so I must be perfect.

camhard
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Post by camhard » Thu Nov 19, 2015 8:35 am

Ya, those are promising. Issue I've had is finding a wide enough nozzle to get good flow, as well as the ratio, as you mentioned. Typically the ratio is set within the nozzle itself and can't be tweaked.

Also, how to push the material through? Pressurizing the material containers is the obvious choice, but this could introduce unwanted air into the solution.

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