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SAFETY FIRST!
(please read)

OVERVIEW
  terminology

EQUIPMENT
  a. required tools
  b. ski press
      - press frame
      - mold
      - bladder
  c. core profiler
  d. edge bender

SKI
CONSTRUCTION
 
a. materials
  b. graphics
  c. ski design
  d. template
  e. base
     edge bending
  f. wood core
     - lamination
     - sidewalls
     - profiling
     - tipspacers
     - inserts
 g. composites
 h. topsheet

LAYUP
 a. preparation
 b. layup

FINISHING

TESTING

VIDEOS
Free Video: Intro to Ski Building (30MB).  Get an overview of the process.



Creating A Template

Overview  Once all the design parameters have been specified, the next step is the draw up the ski and create a template.   Templates are used as guides for cutting base material, determining sidewall placement, etc.  The best method for producing an accurate drawing is to use a CAD program.  Free programs are readily available on the web and any program with good drawing and printing support will do.  Below is an outline of how to draw up a ski and make a template used for cutting out base material.  Templates for other purposes are made in the same manner.  For the following demonstration Turbocad, a popular free program, was used.
 



Step 1:  Set Up Page Size  First set up the page to fit the intended ski size.   Usually this can be done by manually inputting the sheet size (for this example we use 200mm X 2000mm).  

Also set up the document's units to metric and turn on the grid display.   

Step 2  Use the 3-point arc tool to draw in the turning radius, or side cut, for both sides of the ski.  Most programs allow for manual input of the arc points (tip, waist, and tail width) to provide for a more accurate drawing.  

Step 3  Now use the spline tool or any of the arc tools to draw in the tip and tail shapes.  This part can take the longest to perfect but once you get used to the tool functions it should be relatively easy.

Step 4  Most CAD software allow for full scale (1:1) printing.   It's easiest if you have access to a full size plotter but it's also possible to print the ski shape over multiple pages.  These pages are then taped together to form the full-sized paper template.  Make sure you save the file for future reference.   Typical file formats will include the *.DXF extension which represents a drawing file that is compatible with numerous programs including Adobe Illustrator. 

Step 5  Use some spray adhesive to glue the paper template onto wood or MDF (1/4"+  thick).    Carefully cut out the ski shape using a jigsaw.   It's best to get as close to the ski's outline as possible but it's better to leave excess material rather than cutting away too much.   Use a sander to get rid of the excess wood to leave a nice, smooth template.     

Step 6  The final step is to mark some parameters on the wooden template.   This step is optional however it can help out later on during ski construction.   Parameters worth marking are the location of the ski's waist, tip and tail contact points, and the longitudinal center line of the ski.          

Read how a template can be used in for the base preparation process.

 

Sample CAD files  The drawing files for some of the skis we've built are available below.   The *.DXF files should be compatible with most CAD programs and can also be viewed in Adobe Illustrator.   Right click each link and select "save target as" to save the file to your computer.

Red Oktober
Ahmo
White
The Shit
The Buttcrackers

 

 

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